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Lunar Month Chart and Duaa for Sighting Crescent Moon

Learning about the moon phases is a useful activity.  In the past, we've learned about the 8 moon phases and how to identify them by sight and name. Making a moon observation journal and recording the appearance daily is a great way to see how the moon looks throughout the Islamic month.

But I was always also looking for a printable that already showed what the moon looked like each day of the lunar month.  I came across one online and I thought it would be great to post up on our Ramadan bulletin board this year. I included it in a board display and decided to include the duaa for sighting the crescent moon.



I wrote in numbers corresponding to each day of the lunar month  (in the Northern hemisphere, I think you would have to go counter-clockwise for the southern hemisphere????)



The duaa for sighting the crescent moon graphics/text was taken from a reference sheet in my Ramadan Organizer:


You can find the link for the circular moon phase chart at my Islamic Moon Phases Pinterest board below (as well as more resources for learning about the moon phases:




and also see my Moon Phases tag here at TJ Ramadan!

Things to Do During Ramadan #1: Listen to the Seerah of the Prophet

Salafi Sounds has a 30 lesson audio series on the seerah of the Prophet (sallAllahu alayhi wa sallam) which might be nice to listen to each day of Ramadan.  The lessons vary in length from 35 minutes to just over an hour.  The reviews on the site were very positive, including this one:

"This seerah lesson is refreshing and comforting to know that the teacher is striving hard to use authenticated narrations. If you’re new to these lessons then be prepared to be on the edge of your seat because you’ll never experience so many cliffhangers! By Allaah, you should see the brothers faces when Ustadh Abu Hakeem leaves you on the edge, you’d wish these lessons were daily because a week is too long to know what’s happening next! I ask Allaah to reward Abu Hakeem and the listeners, Aameen."



The first two audios have a kind of annoying background sound, but it seems like it stops after the second one.  I am not sure which age levels this would be appropriate for, but if you want to listen as a family and you find them too long, you could perhaps break them up and listen a little after each prayer.  The first two lessons seem to be transcribed in the comments section.